Katie Bouman, black hole, mit, event horizon telescope
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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Katie Bouman, who isn’t an astronomer, but took a remarkable step in developing an algorithm that can take the image of a Black Hole in the event horizon telescope.

The photo was released to the Public on Wednesday after years of work on this with the name of the project called Event Horizon Telescope.

Katie Bouman shared the photo on her Facebook in a disbelief after the captured image was being processed. Later, the photo was shared by MIT’s official Twitter.

KATIE BOUMAN WASN’T EVEN AN ASTRONOMER

It was that Computer Scientist, leading the project, went on to capture the first image of the Black Hole 55 million light years away from Earth.

Watching in disbelief as the first image I ever made of a black hole was in the process of being reconstructed.

Posted by Katie Bouman on Wednesday, April 10, 2019

According to the website of the Event Horizon Telescope, “This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window into the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity”. In simpler words, this will provide us a new prospect of thinking about the universe and its evolution.

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Katie Bouman created the algorithm that captured the first image of the black hole was created three years ago in collaboration of a team of researchers from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of MIT, MIT Haystack Observatory, and Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

The snap which was released to the public for only a few moments, was taken back in 2017 through powerful network of telescopes all around the world.

The picture was taken in M87 Galaxy, where astronomers had been observing the stars rotating in an orbit for more than 16 years.

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The orbit around which those stars were rotating was the Black Hole, of which the world sees now.

Katie Bouman stated in an interview that when she first started on the Project, she had no idea about the Black Holes.

According to National Geographic, more than 200 scientists from different observatories and labs all around the world worked together on the project to create the image.

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